The After Hours Quintet in Concert

The ‘After Hours Quintet’  line up to give Radcliffe a  musical treat with  swing, crooning and Roaring Twenties  fun

RadVentures Arts Group hosts the young and talented After Hours Quintet to play the sounds of The Roaring Twenties at Grange Hall, Radcliffe on Trent and set the tone for a lively 2017.

Hot jazz standards and swing tunes using everything from washboard, sax and trumpet to guitar, banjo and drums will guarantee lots of toe tapping and perhaps some  shimmy turns on the dance floor! Add a great crooner vocalist and the mix is complete for a great night out.

The audience will enjoy standards from Sheik of Araby to Sweet Georgia Brown and many more familiar melodies.

With a mix of splendid musicianship, bucket loads of charisma, fun and timeless music, the evening with be a crowd pleaser for audiences young and not so young.

Event: The After Hours Quintet … Roaring 20s and more

Date & time: Thursday 19th Jan 2017 from 7.30pm sharp

Venue: Grange Hall, Radcliffe on Trent, NG12 2FB

 

Live & Local touring events are sponsored by Arts Council England, Notts. CC and Rushcliffe BC.

Review by John Thorn

The After Hours Quintet certainly had the feet in the Grange Hall stomping and its ears ringing from the applause as the audience kept the band to two encores.
The quintet was fronted by a clarinet/sax player/singer with an amusing patter. He shared leads with an excellent trumpet player and a terrific guitarist, backed by solid double bass and a one handed drummer making up the rhythm section. (Yes the drummer broke a finger earlier in the week and has his hand strapped up …. less can obviously be more, he was superb!)
The band’s repertoire was mostly a range of great 20s/30s/40s Jazz from the likes of Sidney Bechet, Duke Ellington and Django Reinhardt but it was also peppered with cheeky modern numbers such “I wan’na be like you” from the Jungle Book, a Moloko cover and a couple of numbers penned by the singer. Altogether a set which showed off the individual talents of the quintet. It was exciting to see how the band members riffed off one another, improvising solos and coming back together seamlessly.
The band was evidently pleased with its reception at Radcliffe. The audience, as ever, warming to the freshness, energy and quality of the music coming from the Village Ventures stable, and making for an atmosphere to match the “speakeasy” venues of American Jazz in its heyday.